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The Earache / Columbia albums
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El Feroce



Joined: 21 Feb 2011
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 5:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Really hard days for the death/grind scene.

Time for some mammoths like Napalm Death and Entombed to look around and follow the 'business' to make money with their music.

The result? For some, awful like Entombed (buuh...buuh...buuh); mediocre as Carcass (Swansong) and for others a real boom as for Cathedral (The Carnival Bizarre).

The deal with Columbia was one of the worst things ever happened to the death scene, that determined her total eclipsing and further the rising black metal scene (1994-1995).
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under a funeral shroom



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 6:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Totally agree with the poster above, The Black Album (oops I mean Wolverine Blues) and company were instrumental in me delving deeper into black metal. If I wanted to listen to accessible rock music I could turn on any radio station and hear Bob Seger or whatever.
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Ross



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 7:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"The deal with Columbia was one of the worst things ever happened to the death scene, that determined her total eclipsing and further the rising black metal scene (1994-1995)."


This
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DESECRATOR777



Joined: 20 Jul 2007
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Location: satan island, ny

PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the way the columbia merger happened was a guy named jim welch who would initially set up shop for earache in the usa running the day to day operations when it was licensed product to relativity [aka combat's mother company] got hired at columbia so they experimented with the labels biggest sellers to see if they had bigger audience potential. nothing more nothing less.
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Brooklyn Bastard 666



Joined: 08 Oct 2009
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have tons of memories from that time.

All of 1994, I was an intern at Epic Records in the SONY building. A few floors up in that building was COLUMBIA. Columbia/Earache had a section on one of the floors, 2 offices and one small spot for an assistant or intern.I was friends with all of the guys up there, 2 of them started the label Prosthetic Records several years later, EJ and Dan.

Anyway yes, the whole idea of Earache and Columbia was the brainchild of Jim Welch. But I hardly saw that guy back then....he was probably too busy getting screamed at by Sony honchos because bands like ENTOMBED and CARCASS were selling SEPULTURA and SLAYER numbers!
My friend was actually Jim's assistant and she hooked me up all of the time....1994 labels spent TONS on shirts, stickers, etc and I had tons of that stuff from all of the bands.

There was a large storage room FILLED with cds and promo swag for Cathedral, Entombed, Carcass, Fudge Tunnel, Godflesh and Napalm Death.

By the end of 1994/early 1995 it was ALL OVER.
But in late 94/early 95 I was all about At The Gates, Anathema, My Dying Bride, Paradise Lost and Black Metal.
Still loved DM, but BM was far more exciting and dangerous.
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Professor Black



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ethereal Mirror - dung
Wolverine Blues - took a while but grew on me, still prefer the follow-up
Heartwork - B+ album then and now

don't know the Napalm Death one
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Conservationist
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wilding wrote:
Cathedral's shift from murky, oppressive doom to "Oh Yeah!!", acid freakout bullshit killed me.


This one crushed me as well.

However:

God Slayer wrote:
That Napalm Death record, admittedly, is my favorite of their catalog.


Mine too. It was their peak before the decline.
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multicide



Joined: 28 Jun 2010
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fear, Emptiness, Despair was a great album with a lot of crushing moments. I'm probably one of the few who actually enjoy the "groove" era of Napalm Death (they went to total shit with The Code is Red, that Nasum rip off was a disgrace).
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jameswolfe



Joined: 28 Nov 2010
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 4:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heartwork I really loved. I can see why many fans were disapointed with it being an obvious departure from their previous work. But for me it was my introduction to the band. And I still enjoy it when I put it on. Swansong however was boring and weak.

Wolverine Blues I hated. So many people were all excited about it being inspired by the comic. I just thought it had soulless songs. In a bad way.


I never got into Fear Empitness and Despair either. But I may like it now....


The rest I have not heard.
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Wilding



Joined: 11 Feb 2011
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brooklyn Bastard 666 wrote:
I have tons of memories from that time.

All of 1994, I was an intern at Epic Records in the SONY building. A few floors up in that building was COLUMBIA. Columbia/Earache had a section on one of the floors, 2 offices and one small spot for an assistant or intern.I was friends with all of the guys up there, 2 of them started the label Prosthetic Records several years later, EJ and Dan.

Anyway yes, the whole idea of Earache and Columbia was the brainchild of Jim Welch. But I hardly saw that guy back then....he was probably too busy getting screamed at by Sony honchos because bands like ENTOMBED and CARCASS were selling SEPULTURA and SLAYER numbers!
My friend was actually Jim's assistant and she hooked me up all of the time....1994 labels spent TONS on shirts, stickers, etc and I had tons of that stuff from all of the bands.

There was a large storage room FILLED with cds and promo swag for Cathedral, Entombed, Carcass, Fudge Tunnel, Godflesh and Napalm Death.

By the end of 1994/early 1995 it was ALL OVER.
But in late 94/early 95 I was all about At The Gates, Anathema, My Dying Bride, Paradise Lost and Black Metal.
Still loved DM, but BM was far more exciting and dangerous.


Wow, that's pretty cool. It must have been pretty awesome to be in the middle of all of that going on. As ignorant as a stance as it was, I was pretty closed to Black Metal until about 2000 or so. A lot of the aesthetics just didn't appeal to me. A lot of them still don't, to be honest. When Death Metal's decline started to happen, I got more into a lot of punk/hardcore/PV and Oi! stuff that was happening at the time. It took me seeing Satyricon and Immortal in Worcester in 2000 or so to really "Get" the appeal of that kind of metal.

I'll also say that a lot of guys that I know who play metal influenced hardcore love the shit out of Wolverine Blues, Heartwork along with Chaos AD and Crowbar's s/t. It seems like those records were a big influence on the heavier, metallic hardcore bands that started in the 90's. I grew up in Syracuse, and in the years before 94 or so, a long hair in Napalm Death longsleeve at a Sunday matinee didn't always welcome the warmest reception.
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xr2m



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Columbia releases were some of the worst at the time. As hard as I tried, I couldn't get into "Heartwork" at all, even though being a huge Carcass fan for many years. I also worshipped the first two Entombed (despite the lack of LG on "Clandestine"), but that shitty "Hollowman" EP and "Wolverine Blues" album were total fucking garbage. Heard a song or two from "Swansong" and never bought that turd.

I guess it all depends on when you got into death metal.
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Conservationist
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Joined: 25 Feb 2009
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

xr2m wrote:
The Columbia releases were some of the worst at the time. As hard as I tried, I couldn't get into "Heartwork" at all, even though being a huge Carcass fan for many years. I also worshipped the first two Entombed (despite the lack of LG on "Clandestine"), but that shitty "Hollowman" EP and "Wolverine Blues" album were total fucking garbage. Heard a song or two from "Swansong" and never bought that turd.


I think this is how most metal fans felt at the time. Obvious sell-outs were obvious.
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Tyrone Slothrop



Joined: 09 May 2010
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 11:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Conservationist wrote:
xr2m wrote:
The Columbia releases were some of the worst at the time. As hard as I tried, I couldn't get into "Heartwork" at all, even though being a huge Carcass fan for many years. I also worshipped the first two Entombed (despite the lack of LG on "Clandestine"), but that shitty "Hollowman" EP and "Wolverine Blues" album were total fucking garbage. Heard a song or two from "Swansong" and never bought that turd.


I think this is how most metal fans felt at the time. Obvious sell-outs were obvious.


Bullshit. I was 17/18 in '94 and while I didn't love Wolverine Blues or Heartwork quite as much as I loved their predecessors, I still loved those albums. There is so much fuckhole revisionism that goes on in extreme metal, it's fucking ridiculous. In suburban white America (which is probably where most of this stuff was being sold at the time), none of these albums were seen as "sell-outs." Heartwork, Ethereal Mirror, Wolverine Blues, etc. were still a thousand times heavier and better than almost anything else being released at the time, metal or otherwise.
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haraam



Joined: 19 Feb 2013
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 12:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've always loved the Hollowman EP but not Wolverine Blues so much...
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Wilding



Joined: 11 Feb 2011
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 12:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tyrone Slothrop wrote:
Conservationist wrote:
xr2m wrote:
The Columbia releases were some of the worst at the time. As hard as I tried, I couldn't get into "Heartwork" at all, even though being a huge Carcass fan for many years. I also worshipped the first two Entombed (despite the lack of LG on "Clandestine"), but that shitty "Hollowman" EP and "Wolverine Blues" album were total fucking garbage. Heard a song or two from "Swansong" and never bought that turd.


I think this is how most metal fans felt at the time. Obvious sell-outs were obvious.


Bullshit. I was 17/18 in '94 and while I didn't love Wolverine Blues or Heartwork quite as much as I loved their predecessors, I still loved those albums. There is so much fuckhole revisionism that goes on in extreme metal, it's fucking ridiculous. In suburban white America (which is probably where most of this stuff was being sold at the time), none of these albums were seen as "sell-outs." Heartwork, Ethereal Mirror, Wolverine Blues, etc. were still a thousand times heavier and better than almost anything else being released at the time, metal or otherwise.


While I disagree about these records not being seen as "sell outs" (I had several friends that hated these records for their shift in style at the time, who used that term quite liberally), I agree wholeheartedly that Entombed and Carcass put out some decent music on those albums. I don't think their more accessible stuff was created out of a pure desire for commercial success either. I genuinely believe that those bands were progressing naturally in that direction. Each Carcass record is significantly different from the last, and where Necroticism gets pretty technical, melodic, and lengthy, Heartwork goes for a more slick, catchy approach with more of a traditional rock or pop structure with the bulk of the songs. Which I completely enjoy. I love that they threw in some Maiden/Lizzy/Ride the Lightning/Trouble influences on there. The super clean production makes me a little queasy, but I'll manage. As for Entombed, think about being a band that helped pioneer a distinct sound for your region of the world, and then about 4 years later, there are literally over 100 bands that sound almost exactly like you. I'd want to change it up a little bit too. I think they did it well too, despite the fact that Furbowl kind of beat them to the punch, in a sense. I don't think any of these bands had any big ideas about making it huge, not with the growling vocals and the lyrical content that they had, I honestly think that they might have been getting a bit bored, so they culled influences from genre's outside of the extreme metal realm. Seems pretty natural to me.
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