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Selim Lemouchi (The Devil's Blood) dead?!
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Carpathian_Florist



Joined: 19 May 2012
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Madhukapala wrote:
skeletor666 wrote:
sick of this suicide love in bullshit like these clowns are somehow enlightened and can see a clear path .sad to see a young man top himself of course ,especially for a shitty music scene .


I get you. But I don't think he died "for a shitty music scene". I didn't know him, and I don't know any of the people who knew him (I'm just some fan) - but my perception is that he died because he was the kind of person who, in every culture, and in every age, is inclined to die.

Threading its way through every religious/occult system of thought, and even through a lot of ideological systems which regard themselves as secular, is the gnostic impulse. Whether the objective is 'salvation', 'freedom', or 'nirvana', it basically comes from the same place: a sense that life as we know it is incomplete, flawed, and maybe even a kind of prison - that the finitude of human/animal existence is an illusion behind which lies 'something else'. And further, that one is intimately connected with this 'something else'.

People whose lives are full of suffering and alienation are particular inclined to pick up this thread and pursue it vigorously. But it's not just the weak and unhappy. Even those who are rich, powerful, and totally 'fulfilled' in every social and material sense often come to feel that life as they've known it is stale and empty - a source of pain, in some way. If you're at all familiar with Buddhism, you know that this is the legend behind the Buddha's enlightenment - that even from a place of princely wealth and comfort, he was aware of the suffering inherent in the embodied/finite/mortal condition.

All that said, I think it's a mistake to regard death as an escape. I respect the earnestness and commitment of people like Selim Lemouchi - theirs is a genuinely religious impulse in a world that can no longer really recognize such impulses. At the same time, I know that there's no inherent enlightenment in death. This board probably isn't the place for a 'serious discussion' about metaphysics and soteriology, but suffice to say that it is those who most want to "escape" the prison who are the most deeply ensnared. Those who think that the absolute/abyss/divine is "somewhere else", I think, are deeply mistaken.

In any case - much goodwill towards Selim Lemouchi (and similar cases), but much sympathy for those who are injured by his death.



Very insightful post. You have to take in consideration that logic does not play a major role in those who take their own life. Their reasons, actions, and thoughts are different from the average person, especially if that person is obsessed with death or finding their otherworldly path. Some people just do not feel of this earth.
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Secede!



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Madhukapala wrote:
skeletor666 wrote:
sick of this suicide love in bullshit like these clowns are somehow enlightened and can see a clear path .sad to see a young man top himself of course ,especially for a shitty music scene .


I get you. But I don't think he died "for a shitty music scene". I didn't know him, and I don't know any of the people who knew him (I'm just some fan) - but my perception is that he died because he was the kind of person who, in every culture, and in every age, is inclined to die.

Threading its way through every religious/occult system of thought, and even through a lot of ideological systems which regard themselves as secular, is the gnostic impulse. Whether the objective is 'salvation', 'freedom', or 'nirvana', it basically comes from the same place: a sense that life as we know it is incomplete, flawed, and maybe even a kind of prison - that the finitude of human/animal existence is an illusion behind which lies 'something else'. And further, that one is intimately connected with this 'something else'.

People whose lives are full of suffering and alienation are particular inclined to pick up this thread and pursue it vigorously. But it's not just the weak and unhappy. Even those who are rich, powerful, and totally 'fulfilled' in every social and material sense often come to feel that life as they've known it is stale and empty - a source of pain, in some way. If you're at all familiar with Buddhism, you know that this is the legend behind the Buddha's enlightenment - that even from a place of princely wealth and comfort, he was aware of the suffering inherent in the embodied/finite/mortal condition.

All that said, I think it's a mistake to regard death as an escape. I respect the earnestness and commitment of people like Selim Lemouchi - theirs is a genuinely religious impulse in a world that can no longer really recognize such impulses. At the same time, I know that there's no inherent enlightenment in death. This board probably isn't the place for a 'serious discussion' about metaphysics and soteriology, but suffice to say that it is those who most want to "escape" the prison who are the most deeply ensnared. Those who think that the absolute/abyss/divine is "somewhere else", I think, are deeply mistaken.

In any case - much goodwill towards Selim Lemouchi (and similar cases), but much sympathy for those who are injured by his death.


100 percent this.
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Alastor R.



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 12:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Speerhead wrote:
Madhukapala wrote:

I get you. But I don't think he died "for a shitty music scene". I didn't know him, and I don't know any of the people who knew him (I'm just some fan) - but my perception is that he died because he was the kind of person who, in every culture, and in every age, is inclined to die.

Threading its way through every religious/occult system of thought, and even through a lot of ideological systems which regard themselves as secular, is the gnostic impulse. Whether the objective is 'salvation', 'freedom', or 'nirvana', it basically comes from the same place: a sense that life as we know it is incomplete, flawed, and maybe even a kind of prison - that the finitude of human/animal existence is an illusion behind which lies 'something else'. And further, that one is intimately connected with this 'something else'.

People whose lives are full of suffering and alienation are particular inclined to pick up this thread and pursue it vigorously. But it's not just the weak and unhappy. Even those who are rich, powerful, and totally 'fulfilled' in every social and material sense often come to feel that life as they've known it is stale and empty - a source of pain, in some way. If you're at all familiar with Buddhism, you know that this is the legend behind the Buddha's enlightenment - that even from a place of princely wealth and comfort, he was aware of the suffering inherent in the embodied/finite/mortal condition.

All that said, I think it's a mistake to regard death as an escape. I respect the earnestness and commitment of people like Selim Lemouchi - theirs is a genuinely religious impulse in a world that can no longer really recognize such impulses. At the same time, I know that there's no inherent enlightenment in death. This board probably isn't the place for a 'serious discussion' about metaphysics and soteriology, but suffice to say that it is those who most want to "escape" the prison who are the most deeply ensnared. Those who think that the absolute/abyss/divine is "somewhere else", I think, are deeply mistaken.

In any case - much goodwill towards Selim Lemouchi (and similar cases), but much sympathy for those who are injured by his death.


Excellent post.


+1

Also, and with the full respect he deserves...i suppose that there are no details known about how he did it?
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PeterVenkman



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think if someone is in so much pain, physically or mentally, that life becomes too much then one can only regard suicide as the sensible option, some people were not meant to live.
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Dismal



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 2:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alastor R. wrote:
Speerhead wrote:
Madhukapala wrote:

I get you. But I don't think he died "for a shitty music scene". I didn't know him, and I don't know any of the people who knew him (I'm just some fan) - but my perception is that he died because he was the kind of person who, in every culture, and in every age, is inclined to die.

Threading its way through every religious/occult system of thought, and even through a lot of ideological systems which regard themselves as secular, is the gnostic impulse. Whether the objective is 'salvation', 'freedom', or 'nirvana', it basically comes from the same place: a sense that life as we know it is incomplete, flawed, and maybe even a kind of prison - that the finitude of human/animal existence is an illusion behind which lies 'something else'. And further, that one is intimately connected with this 'something else'.

People whose lives are full of suffering and alienation are particular inclined to pick up this thread and pursue it vigorously. But it's not just the weak and unhappy. Even those who are rich, powerful, and totally 'fulfilled' in every social and material sense often come to feel that life as they've known it is stale and empty - a source of pain, in some way. If you're at all familiar with Buddhism, you know that this is the legend behind the Buddha's enlightenment - that even from a place of princely wealth and comfort, he was aware of the suffering inherent in the embodied/finite/mortal condition.

All that said, I think it's a mistake to regard death as an escape. I respect the earnestness and commitment of people like Selim Lemouchi - theirs is a genuinely religious impulse in a world that can no longer really recognize such impulses. At the same time, I know that there's no inherent enlightenment in death. This board probably isn't the place for a 'serious discussion' about metaphysics and soteriology, but suffice to say that it is those who most want to "escape" the prison who are the most deeply ensnared. Those who think that the absolute/abyss/divine is "somewhere else", I think, are deeply mistaken.

In any case - much goodwill towards Selim Lemouchi (and similar cases), but much sympathy for those who are injured by his death.


Excellent post.


+1

Also, and with the full respect he deserves...i suppose that there are no details known about how he did it?


Also +1 for Madhukapala's post.

Why do you want to know the method Alastor R.?? Morbid curiosity or something else/more..?
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Denial Fiend



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Carpathian_Florist wrote:
Ragingwinter wrote:
His playing style always reminded me Eric Clapton meets David Gilmour, which is extremely rare in music today.



That is a massive compliment.


Laughing Laughing
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bMz



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 3:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Denial Fiend wrote:
Carpathian_Florist wrote:
Ragingwinter wrote:
His playing style always reminded me Eric Clapton meets David Gilmour, which is extremely rare in music today.



That is a massive compliment.


Laughing Laughing


What's so funny..May I ask?
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glwdrk



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Speerhead wrote:
Madhukapala wrote:

I get you. But I don't think he died "for a shitty music scene". I didn't know him, and I don't know any of the people who knew him (I'm just some fan) - but my perception is that he died because he was the kind of person who, in every culture, and in every age, is inclined to die.

Threading its way through every religious/occult system of thought, and even through a lot of ideological systems which regard themselves as secular, is the gnostic impulse. Whether the objective is 'salvation', 'freedom', or 'nirvana', it basically comes from the same place: a sense that life as we know it is incomplete, flawed, and maybe even a kind of prison - that the finitude of human/animal existence is an illusion behind which lies 'something else'. And further, that one is intimately connected with this 'something else'.

People whose lives are full of suffering and alienation are particular inclined to pick up this thread and pursue it vigorously. But it's not just the weak and unhappy. Even those who are rich, powerful, and totally 'fulfilled' in every social and material sense often come to feel that life as they've known it is stale and empty - a source of pain, in some way. If you're at all familiar with Buddhism, you know that this is the legend behind the Buddha's enlightenment - that even from a place of princely wealth and comfort, he was aware of the suffering inherent in the embodied/finite/mortal condition.

All that said, I think it's a mistake to regard death as an escape. I respect the earnestness and commitment of people like Selim Lemouchi - theirs is a genuinely religious impulse in a world that can no longer really recognize such impulses. At the same time, I know that there's no inherent enlightenment in death. This board probably isn't the place for a 'serious discussion' about metaphysics and soteriology, but suffice to say that it is those who most want to "escape" the prison who are the most deeply ensnared. Those who think that the absolute/abyss/divine is "somewhere else", I think, are deeply mistaken.

In any case - much goodwill towards Selim Lemouchi (and similar cases), but much sympathy for those who are injured by his death.


Excellent post.


Absolutely! Probably the smartest and most thought out post I have ever read here...
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Candlemass



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 6:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Madhukapala wrote:
skeletor666 wrote:
sick of this suicide love in bullshit like these clowns are somehow enlightened and can see a clear path .sad to see a young man top himself of course ,especially for a shitty music scene .


I get you. But I don't think he died "for a shitty music scene". I didn't know him, and I don't know any of the people who knew him (I'm just some fan) - but my perception is that he died because he was the kind of person who, in every culture, and in every age, is inclined to die.

Threading its way through every religious/occult system of thought, and even through a lot of ideological systems which regard themselves as secular, is the gnostic impulse. Whether the objective is 'salvation', 'freedom', or 'nirvana', it basically comes from the same place: a sense that life as we know it is incomplete, flawed, and maybe even a kind of prison - that the finitude of human/animal existence is an illusion behind which lies 'something else'. And further, that one is intimately connected with this 'something else'.

People whose lives are full of suffering and alienation are particular inclined to pick up this thread and pursue it vigorously. But it's not just the weak and unhappy. Even those who are rich, powerful, and totally 'fulfilled' in every social and material sense often come to feel that life as they've known it is stale and empty - a source of pain, in some way. If you're at all familiar with Buddhism, you know that this is the legend behind the Buddha's enlightenment - that even from a place of princely wealth and comfort, he was aware of the suffering inherent in the embodied/finite/mortal condition.

All that said, I think it's a mistake to regard death as an escape. I respect the earnestness and commitment of people like Selim Lemouchi - theirs is a genuinely religious impulse in a world that can no longer really recognize such impulses. At the same time, I know that there's no inherent enlightenment in death. This board probably isn't the place for a 'serious discussion' about metaphysics and soteriology, but suffice to say that it is those who most want to "escape" the prison who are the most deeply ensnared. Those who think that the absolute/abyss/divine is "somewhere else", I think, are deeply mistaken.

In any case - much goodwill towards Selim Lemouchi (and similar cases), but much sympathy for those who are injured by his death.


A great post in the midst of a sea of childish and tryhard bullshit.
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In Solitude



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Candlemass wrote:
Madhukapala wrote:
skeletor666 wrote:
sick of this suicide love in bullshit like these clowns are somehow enlightened and can see a clear path .sad to see a young man top himself of course ,especially for a shitty music scene .


I get you. But I don't think he died "for a shitty music scene". I didn't know him, and I don't know any of the people who knew him (I'm just some fan) - but my perception is that he died because he was the kind of person who, in every culture, and in every age, is inclined to die.

Threading its way through every religious/occult system of thought, and even through a lot of ideological systems which regard themselves as secular, is the gnostic impulse. Whether the objective is 'salvation', 'freedom', or 'nirvana', it basically comes from the same place: a sense that life as we know it is incomplete, flawed, and maybe even a kind of prison - that the finitude of human/animal existence is an illusion behind which lies 'something else'. And further, that one is intimately connected with this 'something else'.

People whose lives are full of suffering and alienation are particular inclined to pick up this thread and pursue it vigorously. But it's not just the weak and unhappy. Even those who are rich, powerful, and totally 'fulfilled' in every social and material sense often come to feel that life as they've known it is stale and empty - a source of pain, in some way. If you're at all familiar with Buddhism, you know that this is the legend behind the Buddha's enlightenment - that even from a place of princely wealth and comfort, he was aware of the suffering inherent in the embodied/finite/mortal condition.

All that said, I think it's a mistake to regard death as an escape. I respect the earnestness and commitment of people like Selim Lemouchi - theirs is a genuinely religious impulse in a world that can no longer really recognize such impulses. At the same time, I know that there's no inherent enlightenment in death. This board probably isn't the place for a 'serious discussion' about metaphysics and soteriology, but suffice to say that it is those who most want to "escape" the prison who are the most deeply ensnared. Those who think that the absolute/abyss/divine is "somewhere else", I think, are deeply mistaken.

In any case - much goodwill towards Selim Lemouchi (and similar cases), but much sympathy for those who are injured by his death.


A great post in the midst of a sea of childish and tryhard bullshit.


Absolutely.
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grish



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like another MLO victim
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caligulasremains



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
i suppose that there are no details known about how he did it?

i want to know too.
its one thing to die for your beliefs, many people do it.
its another to live and suffer for them.
i've known people who have committed suicide, one of them was the best guitarist i personally knew and was going to be in a band with him.
i think suicide is the most selfish action anyone can take in life but at the same time i don't condemn it. kind of a contradiction i know.
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TriumphanT



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Two years ago! He got the question "Is there anything you always wanted to do but...", check 5:03.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xbmr1yFW_k
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Nemesis



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

caligulasremains wrote:
Quote:
i suppose that there are no details known about how he did it?

i want to know too.

i think suicide is the most selfish action anyone can take in life but at the same time i don't condemn it. kind of a contradiction i know.
that is because you can't relate to someone else's views....

and about the ''knowing'' part: i don't see the need for you to know (or anyone else that is not connected to selim in some personal way for that matter) what exactly happened even though i do know... he is gone... just deal with it...
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Carpathian_Florist



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"There is more spirit and life in the remains of a mummified corpse than any modern interpretation of living"
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