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The Earache / Columbia albums
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Twilight Command



Joined: 26 Mar 2013
Posts: 333
Location: Baltimore, MD, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 3:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wilding wrote:
I'll also say that a lot of guys that I know who play metal influenced hardcore love the shit out of Wolverine Blues, Heartwork along with Chaos AD and Crowbar's s/t. It seems like those records were a big influence on the heavier, metallic hardcore bands that started in the 90's. I grew up in Syracuse, and in the years before 94 or so, a long hair in Napalm Death longsleeve at a Sunday matinee didn't always welcome the warmest reception.


Chaos AD was huge among hardcore kids. I remember my friends and I used to say that you could tell who got into hardcore through metal from who got into metal through hardcore by whether they preferred Chaos AD or Beneath the Remains.

You were going to matinees in Syracuse in the 90s? Ever see Green Rage?
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deathevocation



Joined: 24 Jan 2009
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 4:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tyrone Slothrop wrote:
Conservationist wrote:
xr2m wrote:
The Columbia releases were some of the worst at the time. As hard as I tried, I couldn't get into "Heartwork" at all, even though being a huge Carcass fan for many years. I also worshipped the first two Entombed (despite the lack of LG on "Clandestine"), but that shitty "Hollowman" EP and "Wolverine Blues" album were total fucking garbage. Heard a song or two from "Swansong" and never bought that turd.


I think this is how most metal fans felt at the time. Obvious sell-outs were obvious.


Bullshit. I was 17/18 in '94 and while I didn't love Wolverine Blues or Heartwork quite as much as I loved their predecessors, I still loved those albums. There is so much fuckhole revisionism that goes on in extreme metal, it's fucking ridiculous. In suburban white America (which is probably where most of this stuff was being sold at the time), none of these albums were seen as "sell-outs." Heartwork, Ethereal Mirror, Wolverine Blues, etc. were still a thousand times heavier and better than almost anything else being released at the time, metal or otherwise.


That's interesting. I'm around the same age though in Australia. Definitely seen otherwise down here.
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Wilding



Joined: 11 Feb 2011
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Twilight Command wrote:
Wilding wrote:
I'll also say that a lot of guys that I know who play metal influenced hardcore love the shit out of Wolverine Blues, Heartwork along with Chaos AD and Crowbar's s/t. It seems like those records were a big influence on the heavier, metallic hardcore bands that started in the 90's. I grew up in Syracuse, and in the years before 94 or so, a long hair in Napalm Death longsleeve at a Sunday matinee didn't always welcome the warmest reception.


Chaos AD was huge among hardcore kids. I remember my friends and I used to say that you could tell who got into hardcore through metal from who got into metal through hardcore by whether they preferred Chaos AD or Beneath the Remains.

You were going to matinees in Syracuse in the 90s? Ever see Green Rage?


Yes, I saw Green Rage and the band that came before them, Uprising, numerous times.
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under a funeral shroom



Joined: 29 Oct 2008
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tyrone Slothrop wrote:
Conservationist wrote:
xr2m wrote:
The Columbia releases were some of the worst at the time. As hard as I tried, I couldn't get into "Heartwork" at all, even though being a huge Carcass fan for many years. I also worshipped the first two Entombed (despite the lack of LG on "Clandestine"), but that shitty "Hollowman" EP and "Wolverine Blues" album were total fucking garbage. Heard a song or two from "Swansong" and never bought that turd.


I think this is how most metal fans felt at the time. Obvious sell-outs were obvious.


Bullshit. I was 17/18 in '94 and while I didn't love Wolverine Blues or Heartwork quite as much as I loved their predecessors, I still loved those albums. There is so much fuckhole revisionism that goes on in extreme metal, it's fucking ridiculous. In suburban white America (which is probably where most of this stuff was being sold at the time), none of these albums were seen as "sell-outs." Heartwork, Ethereal Mirror, Wolverine Blues, etc. were still a thousand times heavier and better than almost anything else being released at the time, metal or otherwise.


I was 17 and in suburban America in 1994 and I most definitely considered Wolverine Blues, and to a lesser extent Heartwork, to be major sellout albums.
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Twilight Command



Joined: 26 Mar 2013
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wilding wrote:
Yes, I saw Green Rage and the band that came before them, Uprising, numerous times.


So jealous right now. I haven't listened to that 7" in years, but I still know every word to that record. So bad, but I still love it.
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Tyrone Slothrop



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

under a funeral shroom wrote:
Tyrone Slothrop wrote:
Conservationist wrote:
xr2m wrote:
The Columbia releases were some of the worst at the time. As hard as I tried, I couldn't get into "Heartwork" at all, even though being a huge Carcass fan for many years. I also worshipped the first two Entombed (despite the lack of LG on "Clandestine"), but that shitty "Hollowman" EP and "Wolverine Blues" album were total fucking garbage. Heard a song or two from "Swansong" and never bought that turd.


I think this is how most metal fans felt at the time. Obvious sell-outs were obvious.


Bullshit. I was 17/18 in '94 and while I didn't love Wolverine Blues or Heartwork quite as much as I loved their predecessors, I still loved those albums. There is so much fuckhole revisionism that goes on in extreme metal, it's fucking ridiculous. In suburban white America (which is probably where most of this stuff was being sold at the time), none of these albums were seen as "sell-outs." Heartwork, Ethereal Mirror, Wolverine Blues, etc. were still a thousand times heavier and better than almost anything else being released at the time, metal or otherwise.


I was 17 and in suburban America in 1994 and I most definitely considered Wolverine Blues, and to a lesser extent Heartwork, to be major sellout albums.


I guess I was a false back then. I gladly bought, and blasted at full volume, all of the above-listed "sell-outs."
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Morbid Obesity



Joined: 07 Apr 2011
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're not a false Tyrone.
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Conservationist
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tyrone Slothrop wrote:
I guess I was a false back then. I gladly bought, and blasted at full volume, all of the above-listed "sell-outs."


Your job is to attract rockets.
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Brooklyn Bastard 666



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Conservationist wrote:
xr2m wrote:
The Columbia releases were some of the worst at the time. As hard as I tried, I couldn't get into "Heartwork" at all, even though being a huge Carcass fan for many years. I also worshipped the first two Entombed (despite the lack of LG on "Clandestine"), but that shitty "Hollowman" EP and "Wolverine Blues" album were total fucking garbage. Heard a song or two from "Swansong" and never bought that turd.


I think this is how most metal fans felt at the time. Obvious sell-outs were obvious.



No, this was a GREAT TIME, if you were there and not 10 years old at the time.....COUNTLESS kids got exposed to Death Metal from this era.
And, if you think about it, all of the crap that went down in DM allowed for the BM explosion and the return to DM being more underground and for the die-hards.
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mlotek



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Worshipped Carcass' Swansong when it came out, more so than Heartwork, and I still like Ethereal Mirror the most from any other Cathedral LP (besides the demos I finally heard in the last 5 years).

Was ENTOMBED's Wolverine Blues more influential on the death metal scene turning more rock n roll ("death n roll") than Cathedral or Carcass ? I already stopped listening to Entombed after the demos and first LP by the time it came out.
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Morbid Obesity



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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mlotek wrote:
Worshipped Carcass' Swansong when it came out, more so than Heartwork, and I still like Ethereal Mirror the most from any other Cathedral LP (besides the demos I finally heard in the last 5 years).

Was ENTOMBED's Wolverine Blues more influential on the death metal scene turning more rock n roll ("death n roll") than Cathedral or Carcass ? I already stopped listening to Entombed after the demos and first LP by the time it came out.

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Valgrinder



Joined: 27 Sep 2008
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As I remember it, Wolverine Blues wasnt any "commercial" album, quite opposite in fact.

In that time and couple years before it Entombed and whole swedish death metal was really, REALLY big thing and everyone waited Entombeds new album. And when it finally came, everyone was like "what is this, it sounds so simple, still brutal and dirty?".

So it wasnt any commercial album and surely it wasnt album that everyone waited after "Clandestine" and Entombed guys new that. But what they didnt knew was that they had opened a Pandoras box and soon every other band started to imitate that simplier and groovy style. So in year or two that unique sounding album was just one album in pile of many others.

Or maybe its just me, but thats how I see/saw it. Or were there any other albums (in death metal genre) that sounded like that, especially production wise?
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Nebel



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Valgrinder wrote:


... soon every other band started to imitate that simplier and groovy style. So in year or two that unique sounding album was just one album in pile of many others.

Or maybe its just me, but thats how I see/saw it. Or were there any other albums (in death metal genre) that sounded like that, especially production wise?


Dismember's "Massive Killing Capacity" is of the same ilk musically (only a couple of fast songs, most of the material is mid-paced and there are some more groovy riffs) and its sound is pretty close (same studio of course).
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Valgrinder



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 1:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nebel wrote:
Valgrinder wrote:


... soon every other band started to imitate that simplier and groovy style. So in year or two that unique sounding album was just one album in pile of many others.

Or maybe its just me, but thats how I see/saw it. Or were there any other albums (in death metal genre) that sounded like that, especially production wise?


Dismember's "Massive Killing Capacity" is of the same ilk musically (only a couple of fast songs, most of the material is mid-paced and there are some more groovy riffs) and its sound is pretty close (same studio of course).


Yeah. They were the first ones to imitate that Wolverine Blues sound
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