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Colombian black metal trivia
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Frozen



Joined: 27 Oct 2012
Posts: 3597

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 4:10 am    Post subject: Colombian black metal trivia Reply with quote

I find the Colombian black metal scene to be extremely fascinating and so I thought it would be a great idea with a thread specifically dedicated to its artists and their connections to the outside world, Víctor Gaviria's film Rodrigo D: No Future, and mysterious places such as the Cementerio Universal in Medellín.

Here is a Metal Inquisition article, a Reddit post, and a few of PanzerGeneral and Tezcat's posts from the '90s black metal trivia thread:

Quote:
Colombia: The True Cradle of Black Metal?

As we all know the world of Black Metal is filled with tall tales, rumors, gossip, and folklore, so take this post with a grain of salt the size of Oslo. I'm not an expert in Black Metal history, so some of this may be common knowledge or totally wrong. This account was compiled from conversations that I had with randoms, whose credibility should definitely be questioned. I didn't question it 'cuz their stories were awesome.

Colombia
I was in Colombia recently and, of course, visited all my favorite Metal record stores downtown Bogotá. For whatever reason a lot of the conversations with store employees, owners and other randoms centered around an infamous character in the Colombian Metal scene: Bull Metal. Bull (real name Mauricio Montoya) was a founding member of legendary Death Metal band Masacre. His own life, especially his last few years leading to his death in 2002 are the subject of a lot of speculation and myth. But, that is a topic for an entirely different post. What I want to talk about now is the link between early Colombian Proto-Black-Metal (I love that term), Bull Metal, and early Norwegian Black Metal, especially Euronymous and Mayhem. If you know the story of Mayhem you may think you know where this is going: 'Dawn of the Black Hearts.' Well, eventually, but what happened years before is what I want to discuss.

The story varies slightly on who tells it, but basically it goes like this: At some point in the 80s (some say as early as '84, some say as late as '87) Bull Metal and Euronymous started writing each other and trading tapes, as we used to do back then. I actually traded tapes with Bull myself in the early 90s. Anyway, I was told that Bull Metal sent Euronymous records from a few key Colombian bands. Namely, Parabellum, Blasfemia and Reencarnacion. These three bands, from the fuckhole that was Medellín (second largest city in Colombia) in the '80s, were the core of what was dubbed the "Ultra Metal" scene. In 1986 Mayhem were no more than a Venom cover band. If you've seen their show at Ski (below) you can see that Mayhem were far from the band that would record Deathcrush a year later. The widely accepted and (proudly) retold story in Colombia is that the records Bull Metal sent Euronymous were a major influence on Mayhem and shaped their new sound.

At first the whole thing sounded like the usual Colombian hyper-pride taken to the next level. These people were basically saying that bands from Colombia, although amazing in their own right, were responsible for the sound that defined the Black Metal genre. Is that possible? No way! Mayhem was influenced by Bathory, Venom and Celtic Frost, right? That's what I've always thought!

Could it be True?
First let's look at the timeline. Deathcrush was released in late 1987. Let's say they had been working on the songs and refining their style since early '87, and they listened to the Colombian records in '86. That's plausible, no? We know that the opposite wasn't true. The early Norwegian sound could not have influenced Colombian bands because they had already established their sound as far back as 1983. Parabellum, for example, had a cemented sound by 1984 when they recorded their demo (below).

If you listen to these three bands (clips below) you can hear a sound very similar to what Mayhem (and other early BM bands in Norway) would eventually develop. Parabellum's tempo changes, primal drum beats, scream vocals and raw energy definitely sound like they could have influenced a record like 'Deathcrush' more than Venom or Celtic Frost. Bathory is a little closer to the eventual Mayhem sound. Of course bands are influenced by all sorts of things, but the point is whether or not the Colombian bands had a significant influence on Mayhem's song writing and overall raw sound.

If you do a quick internet search you'll find tons of webpages (mostly Colombian) stating that the aforementioned influence is a fact. There's even an article about it in El Tiempo, Colombia's biggest newspaper. That would be like the Wall Street Journal having an article about Amon Amarth's dislike of the term "Viking Metal." This is a legit newspaper talking about metal tape trading in the early 80s! Fucking crazy! And the article isn't some sensationalist piece of shit talking about the Norwegian Black Metal soap opera and church burnings or something. Anyway, I digress. In the last couple of years, and no doubt fueled by these stories (true or not), the prices of original vinyl from these three Colombian bands (as well as some others) have gone through the fucking roof. A very fucking tall barrel vaulted roof. Some of the records are going for well over U$1000. One of the store owners I talked to in Bogotá told me he'd sold a mint copy Parabellum's "Mutación Por Radiación" 12" EP for U$5000 to some European dudes that had visited his shop last fall. Knowing the infamous Colombian gift for exaggeration (read any Gabriel Garcia Márquez novel) I calculate the actual sale at around U$2500. I have a few of these records myself and I'm not saying I could retire if I sold them, but I sure could take a nice vacation for a few weeks. Shit, I digress again.

So, of course with demand comes supply. Any recordings these bands did, from studio stuff, rehersal demos and shit live recordings are being reissued by labels far and wide. Dude, these live tapes... most of these live tapes are absolute garbage-fuck-ass-shit. Think about it: they were recorded in 1985, let's say, by some dude in a Sonkx boombox (in Colombia in the 80s no one could afford anything Sony) he borrowed from his parents, dubbing over dude's sister's Salsa tape. Dude had to use tape to cover the write-protect hole, 'cuz paper in the hole just falls off and then you have to fish it out of the thing. To make matters worse, dude is friends with the band, so he got a spot right in front of the PA. Dude (I'm tired of calling him 'dude,' let's call him Elias) steals his other sister's Menudo tape, puts tape over the write-protect hole and makes a copy of this horrible recording for the band. Elias keeps the "master." 31 years later, yeah, THIRTY-ONE YEARS LATER (that's a long fucking time) a record label from Greece or some other random county, contacts the band about a kick-ass re-issue of all their recordings. Problem is these bands never really recorded an LP's worth of stuff. Well, out come the demos and the live tape Elias did. The tape has been siting in a box this whole time. It's been thrown around in countless moves and absorbing hella-moisture in all types of basements and storage rooms. Now they are unearthed and sent to some poor asshole in Europe to "re-master." Fuck his life. See? These live tapes are shit. But, I cannot get enough of them. They are my favorite part of all these re-issues, even if some of them are pricey. When I was a young Metal shithead, I always thought of people with money as the enemy and something I never wanted to become. Now that I'm an old dude blessed with plenty of extra dough, I'm very happy to spend exorbitant amounts of money on some of these limited edition reissues so I can play Elias' live tape "remastered" on my overpriced turn table. There is a God! There is a God! And her name is "Real Job"!

Anyway, the reason I brought up these reissues is because it's now in the best interest of these record labels to spread the word about Black Metal basically being born in Colombia, regardless of whether or not it's true. Who doesn't wanna own a part of Black Metal history, right? It's not only the labels, but the Colombian internet Metal community and anyone who owns anything by these bands, right? I guess that includes Elias and myself. But. here's the thing: I believe the story.

Manheim
In 2016 Vice en Español made a documentary called "El Diablo Nació en Medellín" ("The Devil Was Born in Medellín") about the early Ultra Metal scene, mainly Parabellum. At some point during the documentary the topic turns to the subject of Colombian bands having a significant influence on the early Norwegian Black Metal sound. They interview Mayhem's founding member Manheim and he says, quote: "[the sound] came from the Colombian bands. It was a really raw sound. It was different, certainly different than European bands and it was pure rawness. It was very, very raw." He goes on, "... the most extreme bands came from Colombia. They were more avant-garde and experimental, which came closer to our hearts." Alex Oquendo, singer for Masacre (yeah, the same band Bull Metal played in) is also featured in the documentary and says (I'll have to paraphrase, since he says it in Spanish) that the "Norwegians" would tell them that they were tired of the scene in Oslo. That it was mostly skaters who listened to Anthrax and Metallica-type bands and that it wasn't real raw metal like in Medellín. Oquendo also says that the Norwegians had a special place in the Helvete basement* for Colombian bands.

An Aside
I have always found it to be hilarious that teenage boys in one of the richest countries in the world, with excellent social services, and no real crime would have the balls to call themselves 'extreme' in any way at all. Everything 'extreme,' 'scary' or 'evil' about Black Metal is brought on by the members of the scene themselves. Like the kids in rural Iowa who start getting guns and invent gangs in order to be become tough. Meanwhile, if you think about it, Medellín in the mid-80s was the most dangerous city in the world. Owned and run by the Medellín cartel, the city was a motherfucking war zone. Not suburban kids making up war, no, a real fucking war zone. Car bombs, gang violence, kidnappings, police brutality... The city was the epicenter of a civil war between the leftist Guerrillas financed by the Medellín Cartel, fucked up hyper-violent right-wing death commandos, the military controlled by a corrupt government and the local police who basically worked for whomever payed the best price. Kids were recruited or kidnapped at an early age by any of the sides, trained and some would be professional assassins by age 12. Fear, poverty, death, violence, hunger, abuse... dude, THAT is what inspires evil shit. Maybe that's why Oslo kids were skating and listening to "I Am the Law" while kids in Medellín were forming crazy anti-religion, anti-establishment, raw-as-shit bands. I've been to Oslo and Bergen. There is absolutely nothing scary about those towns. They are beautiful, filled with great restaurants and pubs and I really doubt it was very different in the mid 80s. But what the fuck do I know? The interesting part about this is that after years went by and Mayhem established itself as a true pioneer of Black Metal in the early 90s, Euronymous apparently told Bull Metal that his band, Masacre, was too political and its lyrics sounded like a Hardcore band. Masacre were and still are a Death Metal band that sing about how fucked up society is. They sing about poverty, police brutality, war... you know, REAL scary shit, not made up ghouls, ghosts and Harry Potter bullshit. However, I guess Bull agreed, and quit Masacre after he failed to convince the rest of the band to become evil or whatever. He started some BM band I've never cared enough to listen to and whose name I can't even remember. Oh, just to let you know, Medellín is a super safe city nowadays. Beautiful, too. Amazing weather and good looking ladies everywhere you look. Seriously. Worth the visit.

Dawn of the Black Hearts
Finally, just because it'd be weird not to mention it, it was Bull Metal's label. Warmaster Records, that put out the infamous 'Dawn of the Black Hearts' record, featuring Dead... well dead, on the cover. This was also a topic of conversation during my record store pilgrimage in Bogotá. I always heard that the picture had been stolen and used for the cover without permission and that Mayhem were not happy about it. Well. I heard there that since Dead and Bull Metal used to be close (as close as you can be when you live 5,715 miles (9,197km) from each other), Euronymous sent him a copy of the picture and a piece of Dead's skull. Furthermore, Euronymous knew about the record before it came out. Who fucking knows. And really... who fucking cares.


Source: http://metalinquisition.blogspot.com/2017/03/colombia-true-cradle-of-black-metal.html

Important bands:

Quote:
The bulk of Colombia’s extreme bands centred around Medellin, home to the infamous Medellin cartel – headed by Pablo Escobar. Daily life was a constant struggle as violence and death was just a common occurrence for many who lived in this epoch and a prevalent theme throughout their lyrical content. Unfortunately, many whom were part of the early scene passed away in successive years – often victims of the same violence they sang about. The bands came up with a moniker for their own style of metal known as “Ultra Metal”.

Masacre The biggest DM band from Colombia. Their approach alternated between fast and medium paced songs that dealt with the tumultuous state of Colombian society. Savage and vicious.

Parabellum Parabellum were not just one of the first Colombian extreme metal bands, they were one of the first extreme metal bands PERIOD. Their first EP came out in 1987 (although written since 1984) and was a furious mix of the heaviest music from that time period – hardcore, crust, Venom, Sodom, etc.

Reencarnacion One of the enduring bands from the Medallo scene. Extremely dirty and filthy 1st wave black metal.

Profanacion Many Colombian bands came from poor stratos, meaning there was little money for recording proper demos. Profanacion only left behind this rehearsal demo of primitive death/thrash, showcasing a lot of potential.

Sacrilegio This one hurts because Sacrilegio were one of the most promising Colombian acts, yet they only managed to record one rehearsal. Devasting death/thrash that was out of this world. Listen to this!!!

Herpes One of the guys from Parabellum decided to record a grindcore EP. This is Napalm Death/Repulsion/Terrorizer on crack.

Blasfemia A noisy, incoherent mess of ugly South American extremity. In other words it’s pretty cool.

Nekromantie I’m running out of descriptions, but Nekromantie followed in the same footsteps as other bands in Medellin. Basically writing music that was a chaotic mess, yet oddly enough still listenable.

Danger This band differed quite significantly from the others playing the “Ultra Metal” style as their brand of metal was more of a punky thrash with strong social commentary.

Astaroth Not quite as intense as Parabellum or Reencarnacion, but more structured and streamlined death/thrash hampered by low production values. Still worth a spin.

Inquisition I hesitated to include them since the bulk of their releases were recorded in the US, but I know somebody would inevitably ask so here you go. Inquisition began by playing thrash in the teutonic style (obvious Kreator influence) and weren’t bad by any means, but they went on to achieve so much more as a black metal band.


Source: https://www.reddit.com/r/Metal/comments/2wjkue/an_ode_to_the_south_american_extreme_metal_scene/

PanzerGeneral wrote:
Tezcat wrote:
PanzerGeneral wrote:
I have heard stories about that cemetery - it just seem so far out when you come from nice safe Scandinavia. But I must admit I am spellbound by the though of it being possible to pick up human bones from the ground. I would really like to visit that place once.

The pot seed story is great! But Im more fascinated with the "Cementerio Universal".


I know it is off-topic... Not sure if it is still possible to do that but back in the day sure it was. Haven't been in the place for years but, you know? I will pay a visit just to see what does it look like today. I remember it was very, very creepy; this is a very Catholic city and for years the Church had the place to bury poor people who could not affod a proper burial, and for prostitutes, thieves, and homeless people. During the days of Pablo Escobar dead bodies were piled up and left at its gates or people were carried out to the cemetery during the night and were executed on the spot and their half-buried bodies were found the next morning. There were no ossuaries and, when the time came, they unearthed the older graves to make room and their remains were scattered on the ground. Lovely.

I know the city is trying to "recover" the place so I might as well pay a visit before the cemetery goes under some gentrification process. I will send you a PM if you want, with details and pictures if after my visit.
My mate had a few contacts in Colombia and we were told stories like what you wrote above - fucking crazy and impossible for me to understand. Crazy and fascinating! I would love to see photos from that place - do take some if you have the possibility.


PanzerGeneral wrote:
Tezcat wrote:
Not exactly triva but a fun fact (and hopefully it may have happened to any of you)

When the first copy of MORTUARY DRAPE's «Into the Drape» vinyl EP arrived to Colombia, many MANY people got a cassette recorded by Bull Metal with it. The fun fact is that the guy recorded it at 33 1/3 RPM (the vinyl label did not have an indication about the actual speed which is 45 RPM) so we all were convinced that MORTUARY DRAPE were a doom/black metal band and we thought they were quite original ("oh, you see? no blast beats, just pure feeling, man!"). A whole generation of metalheads actually believed that (me included)... until the thing came out on CD. Some people to this day actually like the 'slower' version the most

Hilarious, isn't it
Good one. I remember this happening to someone with the first Mercyful Fate - and when he found out how the King really sang he did not like it any more.
On a side note I recommend Autopsy - retribution for the dead Mlp on 33rpm for the ultimate Autopsy horror doom.


Source: http://www.nwnprod.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=62054&start=315


Last edited by Frozen on Tue Mar 19, 2019 2:12 am; edited 1 time in total
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Naekrospavvn



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 4:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agressor deserve a mention too.
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Frozen



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 4:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Naekrospavvn wrote:
Agressor deserve a mention too.


Agreed.

Rodrigo D: No Future for those who have not seen it: https://youtu.be/fp8MRM-0SGk
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Frozen



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 4:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A Google translation of an article about the hidden stories of Cementerio Universal:

Quote:
The Hidden stories of Cemetery Universal

By: Geraldine Carpio

He had already been to the Universal Cemetery, that old place that many call "holy field", but that no longer has a saint. This old place that is already 150 years old, this bedroom, in which the souls rest and in which today I walk.

So many stories are under my feet, so many are in the air, in the breeze, in the grass and in every natural or artificial flower that adorn the tombs. There are stories of the dead who still have something to talk about, who from the beyond continue to live. Believers think.

A priest or gravedigger, I do not know what it is, receives me ... he tells me about Luchito, a miraculous deceased. I ask him to take me to his grave, a family vault adorned with plaques, thank-you plates for him.

When they talk about the child, they talk about a different child. I can not stop observing his image and wondering why it is different ... The man who accompanies me says that he was born with a rare disease, a disease that did not let him grow up. "His soul is charitable" he mentions. The eternal child lived 23 years, an adult for his age, but who looked and acted like a small child, noble.

I doubt the distance I should take to see his grave, I do not fear him, nor do I come to ask for anything ... but I noticed the amount of things that leave him, from candles (like a saint), water (like a live one) ) and gifts (like the plates) that make me feel a knot in my stomach, while my skin prickles. I still can not stop looking at his photograph.

Luis Carlos Hernández Vergara. March 7, 1950-February, 1973. It reads on the plaque.

More than 40 years have passed and it is no longer known when they began to ask favors from Luchito, but they say that he fulfills them. Houses, scholarships, money, fortunes, love, luck are some of the things that ask the child and that he grants. I want to believe that he grants them, thanks to the plates of gratitude that adorn the place where his body once was and that, perhaps, today are his ashes or the same charitable soul.

My skin is still bristling, candles abound in the place, candles that purify the soul. These objects that, they say, sometimes help connect us ... with the environment.

I turned around and dedicated myself to observe the place, to go through the small paths between tombs and vaults and see what I found.

The man who accompanied me spoke again "days ago we unearthed a pot, with black sands, when we find witches we call the police, that is not legal or moral". There are those who practice witchcraft and the cemetery is also the scene of this, in a grave we find tobacco and a bag of silver color. Both objects in the same place.

The living do not forget, the believers come to visit their loved ones, decorate their graves, arrange them, take care of them. It's funny to see everything so beautiful, happy birthday posters, phrases, and the indispensable roses that tell us that someone else came to visit and celebrate with theirs.

It was inevitable not to think about the Barranquilla culture that was reflected in the coffin of a young man. His tomb was thematic, he had picos in the trees that accompanied him, picos that they identified in life and that they will continue to do even after death.

The last place I walked was the Ossuary of the abandoned Souls.

Where I reaffirmed what I already believed. In search of luck even the dead do miracles. To the abandoned souls, there are also those who thank them for granting favors.

There are no spaces for plaques like in the vault of Luchito, but if there are those who bring them roses, they sign their names accompanied by words of gratitude so that their generous souls take them into account.

Source: http://www.periodicoelpunto.com/2017/10/08/historias-ocultas-en-el-universal/#.XI5AERNKiRu
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.kM



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 5:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is the "El Diablo Nació en Medellín" documentary available somewhere with English subtitles?
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axebix



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 5:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The guy from Metal Inquisition blogspot overreacts a little. There was black metal before Medellin, and there was black metal after it. Deathcrush was equally influenced by SA black death and Obsessed by Cruelty.

Cemetery story was cool. In fact, there are two old German cemeteries in my village too, you can just go there with a shovel and dig up a skeleton. Many of graves are robbed long time ago (the chapel was built in 1784 with cemeteries being active until 70s of the last century), but you can still find those intact. Me and my friends were never bothered to dig, but older generation of metalheads did everything you can imagine.
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Necrosadist666



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, Euronymous was for sure a big fan of the obscure scenes around the world such as the colombian one.
I have to say that I also appreciate those bands, which I only discovered at the end of the 90's (except Masacre which I knew since their demos).

But there's something wrong with the times:
'Deathcrush' was at first a demotape, recorded in march 1987, so the songs should have been composed let's say at the end of 1986, right?

So the records Bull Metal sent to Euro were:
-Blasfemia Ep (out in 1988)
-Parabellum 7" (out in early 1987, as 'Deathcrush')
-Reencarnacion Lp (out in 1988)

Three records out AFTER 'Deathcrush'.

Maybe Bull Metal sent adavance-tapes (already in 1986 for records out two years later? Parabellum aside) or some demo/rehearsal (Parabellum again, i.e.), but the article speaks about records, so...

I think Bull and Euro came in contact after 'Deathcrush' was out (1987) and then they traded some records, could it be the truth?
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kktz



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 7:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's DMDS that really defined Norwegian sound as pure BM, not black/thrash, black/heavy or whatever. Columbian 80's scene was great but still a different sound. May be similar to Deathcrush in some aspects, but it was underground and trading, everyone influenced everyone in 80's yet bands had a sound of their own.
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Naekrospavvn



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Necrosadist666 wrote:
Well, Euronymous was for sure a big fan of the obscure scenes around the world such as the colombian one.
I have to say that I also appreciate those bands, which I only discovered at the end of the 90's (except Masacre which I knew since their demos).

But there's something wrong with the times:
'Deathcrush' was at first a demotape, recorded in march 1987, so the songs should have been composed let's say at the end of 1986, right?

So the records Bull Metal sent to Euro were:
-Blasfemia Ep (out in 1988)
-Parabellum 7" (out in early 1987, as 'Deathcrush')
-Reencarnacion Lp (out in 1988)

Three records out AFTER 'Deathcrush'.

Maybe Bull Metal sent adavance-tapes (already in 1986 for records out two years later? Parabellum aside) or some demo/rehearsal (Parabellum again, i.e.), but the article speaks about records, so...

I think Bull and Euro came in contact after 'Deathcrush' was out (1987) and then they traded some records, could it be the truth?


Somehow I always had a feeling that Parabellum 1st EP had influence on later (Dead era) Mayhem sound. On a side note, wasn't the main riff "Freezing Moon" almost identical to some earlier song by another band?
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kktz



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There's Life Eternal version by Typhon, same lyrics different music if I remember it right.
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Tezcat



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been doing some (metaphorical) digging on the subject the guy from Metal Inquisition blog is writing about and a book is being made about «Metal Medallo». Going through old fanzines and some letters, one thing is certain:

By the time Bull Metal and Euronymous started being pen pals, Deathcrush had been released months ago. Actually, it was Bull Metal and Okendo who first sent a letter to Norway thanks to the insert found on the Deathcrush MLP and the reply they got was from a surprised Euronymous happy to find out that there was some metalheads down here in Colombia. When Euronymous asked for bands, Bull Metal sent him what little output was to be found: 1st Reencarnacion album, the Parabellum and Blasfemia MLP's, the Astaroth 7" EP... and of course the the rehearsals recorded by Agressor, Profanacion, Sacrilegio, Nekromantie, Reencarnacion, Pirokinesis and Masacre.

Sure, Dead and guys liked Parabellum Reencarnacion, Pirokinesis and Masacre, both Euronymous and Dead mentioned them at some point in some interviews (especially Dead with his Reencarnacion patches and his "Reencarnacion" logo carved on the wall) but they also liked Vulcano, and of course, the mighty SARCOFAGO. By 1990 there were plans for DSP to release albums by HADEZ (Perù) and MASACRe.

When it comes to music, by the time the Colombian bands were known in Norway, half the songs on DMDS had been co,posed already done (at least judging from the henhouse rehearsal). And yes, Parabellum had heavier songs by 1984 but unlike their Brazilian peers, their rehearsals --as well as those of Astaroth, Profanacion, Sacrilegio, Agressor and Mierda-- were not circulating in the tape-trading scene of the time, because of Colombia's political and economic isolation but mainly for their nonexistent knowledge of the English language. Bull Metal was the first with the English skills able to communicate with the underground scene and it did not happen until 1988.

So, by the time these rehearsals arrived to Norway, the "ultra metal" bands such as Profanacion, Astaroth, Parabellum, Mierda, Sacrilegio and Agressor had split-up, most of their members were doing hardcore and the first self-identified "death metal" bands from Colombia were Masacre and Pirokinesis.

the "ultra metal" bands have a fascinating story, especially if you consider the fact that they were formed either by kids living in the slums and outskirts of Medellin... and by rich kids living in the poshy neighbourhoods of the city hills. How these two groups of teenagers met each other, shared instruments, rehearsal places as well as common interests is very fascinating. Keep in mind that back in the 80s rich kids were not supossed to socialize with their peers living in the slums, this was a very classist city..

A live recording surfaced not so long ago that nobody thought it existed. This is an audio from a gig some of these bands performed at in Marinilla, a small rural town one hour from Medellin. The concert took place on December, 1987. Profanacion, Nekromantie, Blasfemia and others. Judge by yourselves:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJfWOiOnrvA&t=76s

As for Colombian black metal bands, the very first ones identified as such were Nebiros (heavily influenced by Hellhammer and Samael) and Maleficarum (with strong death metal influence). There were does who tried to be clones of the Scandinavian explosion, and there were others that actually tried to be as original as possible, such as Jason "Dagon" when he switched Inquisition to black metal --thanks to his friend Bull Metal-- and, certainly, Bull Metal himself and his band Typhon, formed right after his departure from Masacre.

The kind of music performed by Typhon is not that great, but the sound they had --especially the drum sound-- was very organic. Surely Bull Metal must have had in mind what the norwegians thought about Sunlight and Morrisound's clicky-cklick bass drum sound.

More will be added later. Smile
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Tezcat



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Posts: 157
Location: Medellin, Colombia

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kktz wrote:
It's DMDS that really defined Norwegian sound as pure BM, not black/thrash, black/heavy or whatever. Columbian 80's scene was great but still a different sound. May be similar to Deathcrush in some aspects, but it was underground and trading, everyone influenced everyone in 80's yet bands had a sound of their own.


DMDS? Wasn't it Live in Leipzig in which half the material for DMDS was composed already? ...or even Blaze in the Northern Sky, Under a Funeral Moon, Burzum's debut or the Thorns material with the defining arpegio tremolo picking riffs?
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kktz



Joined: 15 Oct 2014
Posts: 1379
Location: Slavonia

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tezcat wrote:
kktz wrote:
It's DMDS that really defined Norwegian sound as pure BM, not black/thrash, black/heavy or whatever. Columbian 80's scene was great but still a different sound. May be similar to Deathcrush in some aspects, but it was underground and trading, everyone influenced everyone in 80's yet bands had a sound of their own.


DMDS? Wasn't it Live in Leipzig in which half the material for DMDS was composed already? ...or even Blaze in the Northern Sky, Under a Funeral Moon, Burzum's debut or the Thorns material with the defining arpegio tremolo picking riffs?


Well yes, it was not just DMDS but still a milestone.
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Tezcat



Joined: 04 Dec 2011
Posts: 157
Location: Medellin, Colombia

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, here is some trivia for you:

• Almost every rehearsal by Nekromantie, Agressor, Maleficio and Sacrilegio were recorded at the same place with the same cheap instruments: the rehearsal place of Luis Emilio, a guy that had the second floor of his house as a rehearsing room. Almost every band from 1986-1988 recorded their rehearsals over there. And the rehearsals recorded from 1989 to 1991 were recorded using Bull Metal's drumkit.

• Parabellum and Astaroth vinyls were recorded at the same studio. the sound technician was an Evangelical Christian who almost soiled his pants... both times.

• During Parabellum's recording sessions for Parabellum, a couple of tracks on the main soundboard and a couple of light bulbs got damaged because of the voltage. People at the recording studio atributed it to the Devil and banned the band from recording again over there. Word did spread quickly and almost no recording studio was willing to have the band recording on their facilities.

• Reencarnacion, Blasfemia, Nemesis and the «Ciudad Podrida» hardcore compilation were recorded at the same place, a recording studio designed for tropical music. During Reencarnacion's recording sessions for the first album, the guitar was plugged directy to the console and damaged a couple of tracks due to the voltage.

• Astaroth, Profanacion and Nekromantie were good friends, Astaroth and Profanacion being rich kids and Nekromantie living in the outskirts of the city. They shared the same rehearsal place

• Dario (vocals for Maleficio), Carlos (vocals for Nekromantie / Sacrilegio) were killed on strange circumstances. Rumor has it that Dario had a metal bar(pub and some local gang entered his pub and stole all his vinyls. Dario knew who was behind it and, according to the story, when he approached the gang to recalim his belongings, the gang murdered him by chipping him into pieces with a machete, starting with the hand with which he was pointing at the gang's leader. On the other hand, Carlos from Nekromantie / Sarilegio was shot to death because he looked at some assassin's girlfriend. On a side note, Giovanny "Sacrilegus" (original vocal for Nebiros) was killed basically by the same reason; he flirted with a drug pusher's girlfriend.

• Agressor --with Bull Metal on drums-- and Reencarnacion played live for the first time at the same venue, a small community center on September 19th, 1987. Funny enough, Masacre's first ever live performance --with Bull Metal on drums and his pal in Agressor, Toño, on guitar-- was almost exactly a year later, on September 20, 1988.

• On September 20th, 1988, while Masacre and the other bands were playing, a girl called Natasha was shot to death right at the door of the venue. Why? Because two guys on a motorcycle almost rolled over her, she yelled at them "You bastards!" and the guys stopped the motorcycle, got their six-guns and basically killed her right on the spot... and left. (And no, she was not the inspiration for 'Natassja in Eternal Sleep) Smile

• Astaroth came to an end in December 1987 when one of its member went to do military ervice. The band never reformed and the other exmembers went to join pop bands or punk/alternative bands later on.

• The main composer for at least one of Astaroth's two recorded songs was / is Viola, from the punk band I.R.A.

• The lyrics for 'Life Eternal' were sent to Bull Metal along with the famous suicide photo and skull fragment of Dead's head.

• With the exception of Sacrilegio's other guitar player, both Agressor's and Sacrilegio's tracks found on the "Rodrigo D. No Futuro" compilation were recorded at the same studio, basically by the same line-up: Bull Metal, Toño and Carlos from Sacrilegio.

• Masacre's "Imperio del Terror" and Reencarnacion's "Alucinogeno" demo tapes were recorded at the same place, during the same session.

• Masacre's «Ola de Violencia» was recorded with a guitar Carlso Mario "La Bruja", former Parabellum guitar player and main composer, borrowed them.

• Toño and Bull Metal tried to reactivate Agressor during the mid 90s along with Lorena (Toño's wife and quite the sexy bombshell, let me add) on bass and Barzuth from Typhon on vocals. They rehearsed a few times but Bull Metal moved out of the city, to live in a small rural town and the idea never prospered.

• According to some of their interviews, Barzuth had the flu when he recorded Typhon's "Unholy Trilogy" and that's the reason for the shitty vocals.

• Warmaster Records wnet banjrupt vecause the local authorities intercepted and damaged the packages Bull Metal received. He lost a lot of money and that was the end for his record label.
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Last edited by Tezcat on Sun Mar 17, 2019 1:48 pm; edited 1 time in total
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cochino



Joined: 08 May 2010
Posts: 1407

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can tell the Metal Inquisition guy is talking out of his ass when he says that the Medellín Cartel funded the leftist guerrillas.
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